German

German studies is the field of humanities that researches, documents, and disseminates German language and literature in both its historic and present forms. Academic departments of German studies often include classes on German culture, German history, and German politics in addition to the language and literature component. Common German names for the field are Germanistik, Deutsche Philologie, and Deutsche Sprachwissenschaft und Literaturwissenschaft. In English the terms Germanistics or Germanics are sometimes used (mostly by Germans), but the subject is more often referred to as German studies, German language and literature, or German philology.

SCHOOL EXCHANGE WITH THE MARIA-KOENIGIN SCHOOL,LENNESTADT, GERMANY

The German Exchange which was initiated in the 2007-2008 school year with the Maria-Koenigin School in Lennestadt, saw the completion of it’s second stage on Wednesday last when the German students accompanied by teir teacher returned home. Despite the weather the students had a great time in Ballybunion where the facilities offered by the new Leisure Centre were a welcome reprieve. Some of the students had the opportunity to take a boat trip with the local Sea and Cliff Rescue but the windsurfing lesson with past student Mark Mulvihill was the icing on the cake! The group visited Killarney and also went bowling in the new centre in Tralee – all in all a jam-packed week.

The benefits for the students in terms of language and culture are most valuable and as the families in both countries provide the accommodation the costs are kept to a minimum.

Ms Anne Cummins the Exchange Co-ordinator, expressed her sincere thanks to the Parents Advisory Council in the school for sponsoring some of the events, to Pádraig Hanrahan of Ballybunion Health and Leisure for sponsoring visits to the swimming pool, to the Sea and Cliff Rescue team for giving of their services and to the staff of St. Joseph’s for welcoming the students and their teacher. She also emphasised the importance of the host families without whose participation, the exchange could not happen.

Preparations are already under way for the next group to go to Lennestadt in February

 

School Exchange with the Maria-Koenigin School, Lennestadt, Germany.

The German Exchange which was initiated in the 2007-2008 school year with the Maria-Koenigin School in Lennestadt, saw the completion of its second stage on Wednesday last when the German students accompanied by their teacher returned home. Despite the weather the students had a great time in Ballybunion where the facilities offered by the new Leisure Centre were a welcome reprieve.

Some of the students had the opportunity to take a boat trip with the local Sea and Cliff Rescue but the windsurfing lesson with past pupil, Mark Mulvihill was the icing on the cake! The group visited Killarney and also went bowling in the new centre inTralee– all in all a jam-packed week!

The benefits for the students in terms of language and culture are most valuable and as the families in both countries provide the accommodation the costs are kept to a minimum.

During the week in February when the students from St Joseph’s were in Germany they visited the spectacular cities of Munster and Cologne where they climbed the five hundred and something steps of the bell tower in the famous cathedral. They were brought to an Aquadome style swimming pool and over the weekend the students enjoyed a variety of activities with the host families while the staff gave the adults a very warm welcome to the Sauerland. But of all of the activities and outings, the snow will be one of the most memorable aspects of the visit. At every opportunity, whether when waiting for a bus or train or simply on the way to and from school, the chance to throw a snowball was never missed. It was magic!

While Maria-Koenigin is a much larger school thanSt Joseph’s having nine hundred srudents, there are many similarities. Both schools come from a Catholic background,St Joseph’s having been attached to a convent and Maria-Koenigin to an Abbey. They are both in rural areas and are co-educational The greatest co-incidence of all is with the names of the language teachers – Ms Ilse (Elizabeth) Beul (pronounced Boyle) teaching English in Germany and Ms Eilís (Elizabeth) ) O’Boyle teaching German in Ireland!

Ms Anne Cummins, the Exchange Co-ordinator, expressed her sincere thanks to the Parent Advisory Council in the school for sponsoring some of the events, to Mr Pádraig Hanrahan of Ballybunion Health and Leisure for sponsoring visits to the swimming pool, to the Sea and Cliff Rescue team for giving of their services and to the staff of St Joseph’s for welcoming the students and their teacher. She also emphasised the importance of the contribution of the host families without whose participation, the exchange could not happen.

Preparations are already under way for the next group to go to Lennestadt in February!

“Kölle Alaaf!”

It is a quiet and normal day at the St. Joseph Secondary School in Ballybunion. At first nothing seems out of the ordinary; that is until you see a panda running through the hallway!

Fear not however, it’s only the German teaching assistant; she sings loud songs in the classroom with her students, dances and throws candy at them.

Even the staff members are confused and do not know why she is in costume today, but her students already know it. The Germans celebrate the Cologne Carnival at the moment – the biggest festival in the Rhineland!

The Cologne Carnival has a long tradition in Germany. It is the last festival before Lent, the period in which it was not allowed to eat meat, fat, milk or cheese. So naturally before going into difficult time they had to have one last celebration before fasting.

Carnival (or as the Germans call it “the fifth season”) – begins at the 11th of November at 11.11am. On the Thursday before the beginning of Lent the foolish people receive the key of the city and will rule until the following Tuesday -during this time in Cologne rules an „exceptional-state“ (Ausnahmezustand).

The people wear elaborate costumes and people who do not get into the Carnival spirit by choice may be costumed against their will!

The highlight of the Carnival in Cologne is the „Rosenmontagszug“.  This parade lasts 6 hours and over 1,000,000 people come to see it every year while they dance and sing loudly to the music. Homemade floats drive through the streets – often decorated with political banners. From the top of these floats men, women and children throw altogether 150 tons of candy into the crowd. However you can only receive candy if you know the „Cologne battle cry“: “Kölle, Alaaf!” (long live cologne).

But when in cologne you must also take care – and never say the battle cry of Düsseldorf “Helau” … because then they could throw old candy directly to your head.

So in conclusion, it does not take much to experience the Cologne carnival: cheerfulness, a funny costume, a bag for your sweets and an umbrella – not because it might rain – no! But to protect your head from the shower of candy thrown from the parade!

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